International Mammalian Genome Society

The 16th International Mouse Genome Conference (2002)


POSTER 94 - UPDATE IN THE USE OF SPEED-BACKCROSSES FOR MAPPING HARWELL ENU MUTATIONS

P H Glenister
Medical Research Council

Fray M, Woodward A, Brown S
MRC

Many novel mutations have been recovered from the Harwell mutagenesis programme and a number of these are potential models for human genetic disease. The initial phase in studying an interesting phenotype that may be a putative human model involves linking the mutation to the genetic map of the mouse. When a map position is found, comparison of the human and mouse homologous regions may indicate a prospective candidate gene. Before the mutant gene can be cloned, fine genetic mapping is required.All these procedures call for a large number of backcross progeny. Producing these numbers by conventional breeding is time consuming or may be impossible due to deleterious effects of a particular mutation. Using in vitro fertilisation we have produced enough animals to provide an initial map position from a single IVF session. Apart from the saving in time, there is a valuable saving in animal house space as embryo recipient females are housed in groups until just before parturition. A further advantage is that the backcross animals are born and subsequently weaned on the same day providing large colonies of age matched mutant and wild-type siblings. This proves invaluable where a mutation exhibits an age dependent or progressive phenotype, as is the case in some of the models of deafness genes.


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