International Mammalian Genome Society

17th International Mouse Genome Conference

9-12 November 2003, Braunschweig, Germany


POSTER 52 - LARGE-SCALE IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF NUCLEAR MATRIX-ATTACHMENT REGIONS IN THE DISTAL IMPRINTED DOMAIN OF MOUSE CHROMOSOME 7

Purbowasito W
1) National Institute of Genetics, 2) Kyushu University

Co-Authors: 1) Suda C, 1,3) Yokomine T, 4) Zubair M, 1) Sado T, 5) Tsutsui K, 1,3) Sasaki H
Institutions: 1) National Institute of Genetics, 3) Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 4) National Institute for Basic Biology, 5) Okayama University

A small subset of genes in the mammalian genome are epigenetically imprinted so that they are expressed in a parental-origin-specific manner. Many imprinted genes form clusters in the genome: for example, fourteen imprinted genes have been identified in the distal imprinted domain on mouse chromosome 7. This domain is further divided into two functional sub-domains, the Igf2-H19 sub-domain and the Kcnq1 (Kvlqt1)-Cdkn1c (p57kip2) sub-domain. To understand the mechanisms of imprinting of this domain, it is important to know its higher-order chromatin structure in the nucleus. Genome DNA is attached to the nuclear matrix at specific sites and forms chromosomal loops. These matrix attachment/association regions (MARs) play important roles in transcriptional regulation and defining the domain boundaries. We now constructed three cosmid contigs covering almost all of the 1-Mb imprinted domain. Using 45 cosmid clones from these contigs, we mapped a total of 52 MARs. Two clusters of MAR were found in intron 9 of Kcnq1 and in the intergenic region between Th and Ins2. Both of these regions are extraordinarily rich in repetitive DNA, especially the LINE1 repeats. Since the latter cluster is located between the two imprinted sub-domains, it could play a role in defining the sub-domains.


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