International Mammalian Genome Society

17th International Mouse Genome Conference

9-12 November 2003, Braunschweig, Germany


POSTER 3 - IDENTIFICATION OF QTLS FOR HEAT AND CAPSAICIN SENSITIVITY BETWEEN MOUSE STRAINS KJR AND C57BL/6

Furuse T
National Institute of Genetics

Co-Authors: Shiroishi T, Koide T
Institutions: National Institute of Genetics

Pain sensation is an essential alert for avoiding environmental danger and feeling tissue damage or illness. In spite of the essential role of pain sensation, surplus pain is stressful or unpleasant for both animals and human. Both of heat evoked pain and capsaicin sensation are transmitted to central nervous system via VR1 (TRPV1) receptor, a multi functional pain receptor. Capsaicin is the main chemical component of hot chili peppers providing its hot taste and causes sensation in physiological pain system. The difference of pain sensitivity is genetically controlled. To elucidate the genetic system of diversity of pain sensitivity, we applied both capsaicin sensitivity test and 52℃ hot plate test for two strains, C57BL/6, a laboratory strain, and KJR, a wild-derived strain. In these tests, KJR indicated lower sensitivity than C57BL/6 for both capsaicin and heat evoked pain. We conducted QTL analyses to characterize genetic loci involved in the different sensitivity to capsaicin and heat evoked pain between C57BL/6 and KJR. In the study, 470 F2 mice were generated from the F1 mice obtained from the cross of the C57BL/6 and KJR. We applied capsaicin sensitivity test and 52℃ hot plate test for the F2 progeny. In the mapping study, four significant QTLs for capsaicin sensitivity designated as Capsq 1-4 were detected on chromosome 2, 7, and 8 and two significant QTLs for heat sensitivity designated as Hepsq 1-2 were detected on chromosome 2 and 18.


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