International Mammalian Genome Society

logo18th International Mouse Genome Conference

17-22 October 2004, Seattle, USA


POSTER 3 - DRIVING ALLELES AT THE DISTORTER LOCUS IN THE OM MEIOTIC DRIVE SYSTEM PREDATE THE DIVERGENCE OF THE MUSCULUS, SPICILEGUS, AND SPRETUS LINEAGES

Doherty HE 1, Kim K 2, Bell TA 1, De la Casa-Esperon E  3, Ideraabdullah F 1, Pardo-Manuel de Villena F 1

1 Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, 2 Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, 3 Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States

In mammals, meiotic drive is achieved by preferential segregation of one chromosome over another to the functional product of female meiosis.  Two components are required in all meiotic drive systems, a Responder and a Distorter.  The Distorter is the effector in the system, and “drives” alleles at the Responder.  The goal of this project is molecular identification of the Distorter and the Responder in the Om (Ovum mutant) meiotic drive system.  The Responder maps to the Om locus (Chr 11) while the Distorter is located 2.5 Mbp distal to Om.  We have defined a 315kb candidate interval for the Distorter locus and generated a haplotype map built by sequencing 50 fragments of 450bps.  We compiled the meiotic drive phenotypes for 18 wild-derived and classical inbred strains (representing three species of the Mus genus) with each strain classified as driving or non-driving.  Based on the presence of drive in Mus spicilegus, we conclude that driving alleles have been segregating in the Mus genus for over 1.5 million years.  Within Mus musculus, driving alleles have been observed only in Mus musculus domesticus strains.  Therefore, allelic variation at the Distorter is an example of ancient variants in the Mus musculus lineage that has been maintained in the population over millions of generations.  Unsurprisingly given the age of the mutation, the occurrence of extensive recombination creates special challenges to haplotype mapping.

[an error occurred while processing this directive]