International Mammalian Genome Society

logo18th International Mouse Genome Conference

17-22 October 2004, Seattle, USA


PLENARY PRESENTATION

TUESDAY OCTOBER 19

8.30am – 9.00am

RECOMBINEERING: A POWERFUL NEW TOOL FOR MOUSE FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS

Copeland NG 1, Warming S1, Liu P2, Jenkins NA1

1 National Cancer Institute, Frederick, United States, 2 The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Highly efficient phage-based Escherichia coli homologous recombination systems have recently been developed that enable genomic DNA cloned into plasmids, PACs or BACs to be modified or subcloned directly in E. coli without the need for restriction enzymes or DNA ligases.  This new form of chromosome engineering, termed recombineering, is highly efficient and greatly decreases the time it takes to create transgenic or knockout mouse models by conventional means.  Recombineering also facilitates many kinds of genomic experiments that have been difficult, if not impossible, to carry out before, and should enhance functional genomics studies by providing better mouse models and a more refined genetic analysis of the mouse genome.  In my talk, I will describe some of the many uses of recombineering for mouse functional genomic studies.  I will also describe a new recombineering strain we have developed that makes it possible to efficiently introduce double-strand DNA targeting cassettes (i.e., DNA containing epitope tags or loxP sites) or mutations (i.e. point mutations or small deletions) into cloned DNA by positive-negative selection, thus obviating the need for a linked selectable marker.

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